A Month Ago

Carrefour has already found that, by enabling its clients to be able to track the provenance of some of its meat, dairy, and fruit products, there has been an increase in sales.

In the hyper-competitive grocery market, anything which one supermarket can give them an edge is bound to be copied by its competitors. Carrefour has said it will increase the number of products it sells using its Blockchain platform which offers greater transparency as to where these products originate from, where they were packed or picked, and if it subject to any genetically modified organisms, antibiotics or pesticides. It is now looking to expand in the future by adding non-food lines, i.e. clothing, as well as more information such as how much the farmer earns out of the shelf price. It is also experimenting with ways to identify products which do not rely on a “quick response’ (QR) code.

Emmanuel Delerm, Carrefour’s Blockchain project manager, told Reuters “The Blockchain initiative has proved most popular so far in China - where it is already common for shoppers to scan QR codes, followed by Italy and France, with some people spending as long as 90 seconds reading the provenance information. They are interested in information about the origin of products and how animals are cared for, with one video of a farmer with his chickens proving popular, millennials are buying less, but buying better products for their health, for the planet.”

To date, Carrefour has focused on using Blockchain technology to provide details on its own label brands. However, it has also been collaborating with Nestle to give consumers access to information for Nestle’s
Mousline potato puree products, thus allowing customers to be able to see it is only made from French potatoes.
It is not just Carrefour which is using QR codes and Blockchain technology to allow customers to get detailed information about the food they are buying - SAP has a platform too. Blueberry farmers in Chile are adding QR codes to their products so that the end-buyer is able to track the journey from the farm to the shelf. As reported in a
Forbes article by simply scanning the QR code with our smartphones, we’ll see proof of where the berries were grown, learn about the farm’s sustainability practices, and be assured that the harvesters are well-treated under fair labor laws. Blockchain will be behind it all”.

In Asia, the
South China Morning Post reported that Alibaba is trialling a project with four farmers in New Zealand to enable consumers to be able to identify what raw ingredients have been used, simply by using their mobile phones to scan the QR code. The intention is to build a “Food Trust Framework”, giving more information about the food consumers are buying. In the event of there being a problem, e.g. some form of contamination getting into the food distribution chain, if one is able to track the provenance using Blockchain technology, it will be faster to identify the source of the problem.

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Ernst and Young (E&Y), one of the top four accountants globally, has just announced that it is helping a firm called Blockchain Wine, in Singapore, to operate a platform using Blockchain technology.

The platform will be called Traceability, Authenticity, Transparency, Trade, Origin, and  Opinion (TATTOO), and will initially be used by an Asian wine retailer, called The House of Roosevelt, to be able to track and ensure the provenance of wine from vineyards to customers. It is also the intention to be able to use tokens, which help producers pay to track wine, by improving their supply chain logistics. In time, this may lead to lower insurance premiums, as TATTOO offers greater traceability from vine to a shop’s shelf.

There are other companies that are also using Blockchain technology to help track, trace, and improve the provenance of wine. Everledger, which started its platform in 2016 in response to research, claimed that up to 20% of international wine sales were counterfeit. Vinsent also has a Blockchain-powered platform for wine. It was formerly known as VinX and attracted investment from the venture capital arm of US-based Overstock (the firm that has created a Digital Asset trading platform in conjunction with the Boston Stock Exchange). Vinsent’s platform enables consumers to buy wine directly from vineyards and so cuts out many of the intermediaries while speeding up the time for the viticulturist to be paid.

The chart above shows the demand for red wine from China and Hong Kong has been increasing, and the Asian total wine market is predicted to grow by 4% p.a from its current $57,372 million size. As the Chinese population ages, it is expected that China will become the second biggest wine market globally. The US has 8.7% of the international share of imported wine – worth $22.9 billion, according to Vinexpo/IWSR figures.

Global sales of wine are expected to reach over $224 billion by 2021, and there is increasing demand for sparkling wine, together with premium wines, where provenance is so important. Therefore, with the credibility of a firm such as E&Y offering their Blockchain skills to create the ability to track and trace wine from vineyard to consumer, the outlook for Blockchains being used in the wine industry looks “rosé”.

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Pepsi has been working with Mindshare to see how the process of digital advertising can be more efficient and cost-effective.

Only a small proportion of the money spent by advertisers is productive, as there are numerous intermediaries “taking a cut”. Also, a considerable amount of the money spent on digital adverts is fraudulent or inaccurate, as it includes activity from "bots".

Pepsi, this March, ran a trial in Asia and discovered that there was a 28% improvementin terms of costs for viewable impressions, in running the campaign through smart contracts, versus one without,” according to Mindshare.

There are a number of other firms exploring how Blockchain can help in the advertising world including Kellogg, Kimberly-Clark, Pfizer, Unilever and AB InBev (which owns Budweiser beer). The International Advertising Board, in a study it undertook, found 48% of clicks from adverts are erroneous.

Coca Cola has been running various projects for over a year on how it can use Blockchain technology to improve the transparency of labour conditions among its workforce. They have been working with the US State Department to create a digital secure database on which to hold workers’ contracts and employment rights.

Meanwhile, in London, Dandelyan (which won the World’s Best Bar for 2019) and CUB restaurant (which won the sustainability award), are both using Blockchain technology to enable its cocktail drinkers to know where the ingredients in their drinks have come from.

There is a growing interest, especially from millennials, to know the provenance of what they are consuming. Furthermore, they are prepared to pay extra if they can be sure of knowing what they are buying, where it has come from and how it has been produced.

If a cup of coffee is more your thing, then look no further than Starbucks, which signed-up the ex-head of global sales and the Windows division of Microsoft in 2015. Starbucks continues to embrace technology and drive efficiency savings, and by using Blockchain technology is enabling it to have greater transparency over its supply chains and where some of its consumables, like coffee beans, come from.

According to the International Labour Organisation, nearly 25 million people work in forced-labour conditions worldwide, with 47% of them in the Asia-Pacific region. Therefore, if platforms using Blockchain technology can be created to reduce the exploitation of labour, it has to be welcomed.

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2 Months Ago

MISE has reportedly invested over 40 Million Euros into Blockchain projects, as Italy looks at using its wine industry to bring greater transparency to products made in Italy.

It is hoped this will empower the fight against counterfeits and fraudulent products claiming to be made in Italy, made elsewhere.

Fraud is a real challenge for the wine industry: It is estimated that the Italian wine industry loses over Euro 2 Billion due to wine fraud. This has encouraged Ernst and Young  (EY), to use Blockchain technology to help vineyards via its EY Ops Chain, originally launched over two years ago.

It is not just Italian vintners who are turning to Blockchain. Bufala Campana, famous over the world for its mozzarella, is using Blockchain technology and QR codes that can be scanned, using a mobile phone, to trace the products’ provenance.

One of the first companies to use Blockchain to trace the origins of a product was Everledger, which brought greater transparency to the diamond industry.  It is now turning its attention to wine, using Near-Field Communication (NFC) technology, via tiny silicon chips within labels and corks. These can be scanned, and the bottle’s provenance traced, giving consumers confidence they are buying wine as stated on the label.

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https://coinidol.com/italian-wine-blockchain/

3 Months Ago

Bumble Bee, one of America’s largest food supply companies, has announced that they are partnering with SAP and using its cloud-based Blockchain technology platform.

Customers will be able to scan QR codes on the packaging with a smartphone to trace the journey of yellow-fin tuna when shopping, tracking the journey from the ocean to the shelf, providing traceability and so greater transparency and assurance that the fish is fresh and coming from sustainable sources – as they will know where and when it was caught.

Also in the USA Seattle-based Transparent Path, and Penta Network, from Los Angeles, have joined forces to offer greater traceability to shoppers and food producers. The aim is to quickly be able to track food supplies so reducing risks related to food-borne illnesses, and giving customers greater knowledge of how and where the food they are buying has been produced.

Such projects are becoming more and more common globally as consumers demand information of sustainability, provenance and higher food standards, especially in the light of an 83% rise in some meat and chicken product recalls over concerns around potential pathogens and food-based contaminants in the US last year.

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http://xparent.io/food-startups-transparent-pat...duce-risk/

5 Months Ago

IBM has been developing its Food Trust Blockchain project since 2016.

Nestle has been using Food trust to track where some of its ingredients come for its baby food brand Gerber. Food Trust, keep data about harvests, processing, packaging, and shipping, that can be retrieved in seconds compared to days or even weeks using traditional data storage records. Food Trust has performed traceback tests as fast as 2.2 seconds, compared to seven days before blockchain, FreightWaves reported.

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https://cointelegraph.com/news/nestle-ibm-food-...rs-in-2019
“Consumers will have a whole new level of transparency about whether the food we eat is contributing to environmental degradation or social injustice such as slavery”, said WWF- Australia CEO Dermot O’Gorman.

By scanning product QR codes. Once a QR code is scanned, the user is shown information about where a specific product came from, when and how it was produced, and how it traveled along the supply chain. This information is then put on a Blockchain which records the movement of the product and stores additional information, such as the temperature of food in storage.

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https://www.wwf.org.nz/what_we_do/marine/blockc...a_project/