A Month Ago

MISE has reportedly invested over 40 Million Euros into Blockchain projects, as Italy looks at using its wine industry to bring greater transparency to products made in Italy.

It is hoped this will empower the fight against counterfeits and fraudulent products claiming to be made in Italy, made elsewhere.

Fraud is a real challenge for the wine industry: It is estimated that the Italian wine industry loses over Euro 2 Billion due to wine fraud. This has encouraged Ernst and Young  (EY), to use Blockchain technology to help vineyards via its EY Ops Chain, originally launched over two years ago.

It is not just Italian vintners who are turning to Blockchain. Bufala Campana, famous over the world for its mozzarella, is using Blockchain technology and QR codes that can be scanned, using a mobile phone, to trace the products’ provenance.

One of the first companies to use Blockchain to trace the origins of a product was Everledger, which brought greater transparency to the diamond industry.  It is now turning its attention to wine, using Near-Field Communication (NFC) technology, via tiny silicon chips within labels and corks. These can be scanned, and the bottle’s provenance traced, giving consumers confidence they are buying wine as stated on the label.

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https://coinidol.com/italian-wine-blockchain/
Bumble Bee, one of America’s largest food supply companies, has announced that they are partnering with SAP and using its cloud-based Blockchain technology platform.

Customers will be able to scan QR codes on the packaging with a smartphone to trace the journey of yellow-fin tuna when shopping, tracking the journey from the ocean to the shelf, providing traceability and so greater transparency and assurance that the fish is fresh and coming from sustainable sources – as they will know where and when it was caught.

Also in the USA Seattle-based Transparent Path, and Penta Network, from Los Angeles, have joined forces to offer greater traceability to shoppers and food producers. The aim is to quickly be able to track food supplies so reducing risks related to food-borne illnesses, and giving customers greater knowledge of how and where the food they are buying has been produced.

Such projects are becoming more and more common globally as consumers demand information of sustainability, provenance and higher food standards, especially in the light of an 83% rise in some meat and chicken product recalls over concerns around potential pathogens and food-based contaminants in the US last year.

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http://xparent.io/food-startups-transparent-pat...duce-risk/

3 Months Ago

IBM has been developing its Food Trust Blockchain project since 2016.

Nestle has been using Food trust to track where some of its ingredients come for its baby food brand Gerber. Food Trust, keep data about harvests, processing, packaging, and shipping, that can be retrieved in seconds compared to days or even weeks using traditional data storage records. Food Trust has performed traceback tests as fast as 2.2 seconds, compared to seven days before blockchain, FreightWaves reported.

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https://cointelegraph.com/news/nestle-ibm-food-...rs-in-2019
“Consumers will have a whole new level of transparency about whether the food we eat is contributing to environmental degradation or social injustice such as slavery”, said WWF- Australia CEO Dermot O’Gorman.

By scanning product QR codes. Once a QR code is scanned, the user is shown information about where a specific product came from, when and how it was produced, and how it traveled along the supply chain. This information is then put on a Blockchain which records the movement of the product and stores additional information, such as the temperature of food in storage.

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https://www.wwf.org.nz/what_we_do/marine/blockc...a_project/